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Nursing scholarship and leadership in tobacco control

      Tobacco use and exposure to tobacco smoke remain the leading causes of preventable death and disease in the United States and worldwide. Research demonstrates that nurses and professional nursing organizations can make a significant difference in minimizing this disease-burden caused by tobacco through nursing research, policy, practice, and education. The American Academy of Nursing recommends that tobacco control receives priority corresponding with the death and disease impact of tobacco use on nursing research, education, health policy, and health care agenda. Actions are needed to ensure that all nurses are prepared to implement evidence-based interventions to assist tobacco users to quit and to support the implementation of tobacco control policies. Employers of nurses and nursing schools need to ensure that access to tobacco dependence treatment is provided to nurses and nursing students. Greater investment and focus are needed to ensure equality in access to tobacco-dependence treatment as well as equality and access to policies that protect against tobacco harms.
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      1. World Health Organization. (2011). WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011: Warning about the dangers of tobacco. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/tobacco/global_report/2011/en/index.html.

      Additional Reading

      1. American Lung Association. (2012). The state of tobacco control. Retrieved from http://www.stateoftobaccocontrol.org.

        • Sarna L.
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        Tobacco control in the 21st century: A critical issue for the nursing profession.
        Research in Theory and Nursing Practice. 2005; 19: 15-24
        • Sarna L.
        • Bialous S.A.
        Why nursing research in tobacco control?.
        Annual Review of Nursing Research. 2009; 27: 3-31
      2. Advancing Nursing Science in Tobacco Control: Annual Review of Nursing Research. Vol. 27, No. 1. Springer Publishing, New York2009
      3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2012). Healthy People 2020, Topics & Objectives: Tobacco Use. Retrieved from http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=41.

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