Advertisement

Leveraging a funding collaborative to develop more PhD prepared nurse scientists and leaders

Published:September 22, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.outlook.2022.07.003

      Highlights

      • The manuscript describes a funding collaborative developed to increase the number of PhD prepared nurses to be supported through the RWJF Future of Nursing Scholars Program.
      • RWJF contributed $20 M and thirteen other funders contributed an additional $3Mto the initiative. The additional funds supported 42 nurses to earn their PhD degree through the program.
      • Six of the 13 funders are health systems, four are regional or health related philanthropies, and others include United Health Care, Johnson & Johnson, and the Care Institute.
      • The perspectives of RWJF and three other funders are described in the paper.
      • The paper will be of interest to nursing programs seeking and/or receiving grant funding as well as for funders considering support of nurses to pursue additional education.

      Abstract

      Background

      Over its almost 50 year history, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has provided about $500M to nursing initiatives focused on education, practice, policy and leadership development. While RWJF was most often the sole funder of many of these initiatives, it has also joined with others to create a larger and more sustained impact on particularly challenging nursing, health, and health care issues.

      Purpose

      The purpose of this article was to describe the challenges and opportunities of a unique funding collaborative developed to engage new partners, increase the visibility of doctoral nursing education and increase funding of the RWJF Future of Nursing Scholars program to develop more PhD prepared nurses and nurse faculty.

      Methods

      Interviews were conducted with several members of the FNS Funders Collaborative as well as the scholars they supported. The perspectives of three funders, a regional philanthropy (IBC Foundation) and two health systems (Cedars Sinai and Sharp HealthCare) are presented here. Together they supported 13 nurses to complete their PhD through the RWJF Future of Nursing Scholars program.

      Findings

      RWJF contributed $20 M and 13 other funders contributed an additional $3Mto the initiative. The additional funds supported 42 nurses to earn their PhD degree through the program. Six of the 13 funders are health systems, four are regional or health related philanthropies, and others include United Health Care, Johnson & Johnson, and the Care Institute.

      Discussion

      There were many lessons learned for RWJF and the other funders. Given the size of RWJF, some other philanthropies were concerned about how contributions would be represented, others wanted their funding to go directly to care improvement. Some health systems were not prepared for their nurses to decrease work time while pursuing further education. The nurse faculty and nurse PhD shortages have persisted now for over a decade. Although FNS made a significant contribution by developing over 200 new nurse PhDs (faculty and leaders), more funding collaborations that engage new and different partners must be developed so that nursing education does not have to focus on the same problems in the next decade.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Nursing Outlook
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • American Association of Colleges of Nursing 2019-2020a
        Enrollment and Graduations in Baccalaureate and Graduate Programs in Nursing.
        American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC2020
        • Fang D.
        Nursing Faculty shortage in Baccalaureate and Graduate Programs, 2009-2019.
        in: Conducted at the meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Education and Practice, Washington, DC by Zoom delivery. 2020
        • Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine)
        The Future of Nursing 2020: Leading Change, Advancing Health.
        National Academies Press, Washington, DC2011
        • Jellinek P.
        • Reinhardt R.
        • Ladden M.
        • Salmon M.
        Round Six of Partners Investing in Nursing's Future: Implications for The Health Sector, Policy Makers, And FoundationsHealth Affairs.
        Health Affairs, 2015 (34 (7) July)
        • National Advisory Council on Nursing Education and Practice. HRSA Bureau of Health Workforce
        10th Report to the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the US Congress. Impact of the Nursing Faculty Shortage on Nursing Education and Practice. 2010
        • National Advisory Council on Nursing Education and Practice. HRSA Bureau of Health Workforce
        17th Report to the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the US Congress. Preparing Nurse Faculty and Addressing the Shortage of Nurse Faculty and Clinical Preceptors. 2020